Salt-Rising Bread, or Pioneer Bread

Whatever you call it, it's Country's all-time most requested recipe.

Doris Musick making Pioneer Bread

Doris Musick making Pioneer Bread

Doris Musick's mixing up a batch of Pioneer Bread, using an ancient recipe book given to her by her father-in-law.

Pioneer Bread

Pioneer Bread

Doris' hard work results in golden, crusty loaves of butter-melting pioneer bread.

    Story by Lorie West

    In its Dec./Jan. 2006 issue, Country published the article “Pioneer Bread” from Doris Musick of Cleveland, Virginia. Little did we anticipate the impact. Honestly, it’s nearly six years later and folks still write in for the recipe.

    I’d joined Country‘s team as editorial assistant years after Doris’ article, so when I had the chance to share the recipe on this blog, I had to go back and find it. (That’s Doris in the photo, just as she’s pictured in the article. See the bread pans lined up on the counter, next to the rooster lamp!) I started to read:

    “I have long marveled at the ingenuity of past generations,” Doris wrote. “So, when my 90-year-old father-in-law gave me one of his old books full of recipes, I found I couldn’t put it down.”

    “As I pored over the worn delicate pages, I chuckled over one dish with instructions that began, “Take 7 or 8 hog’s heads …” There was an intriguing recipe for lye soap. The first ingredient was homemade lye, which they just assumed you had. The recipe my family got most excited about, though, was salt-rising bread. Since pioneer settlers rarely had yeast, they depended on a replacement, using a starter made with cornmeal.”

    The rest of the article takes you through Doris’ baking experience—notes that are woven into the bread recipe below. Then, at the very end, Doris takes the bread from the oven, and takes me right back to my childhood.

    “As soon as the bread cooled enough to cut, we were lavishly smearing butter on the warm slices. And broad smiles all around the table proved the results were well worth the work. Some things never change.”

    And I’m nodding to myself, thinking that there are some things you don’t want to change. So, even though there are thousands of loaves of gourmet bread out there waiting to be purchased, and millions of bread recipes in libraries and online, I want to make a loaf of salt-rising pioneer bread.

    If Doris and her recipe inspire you, too, tell us about it below, in the “comments” section.

    SALT-RISING BREAD

    Doris Musick, Cleveland, Virginia

    The night before you wish to do your baking:

    Use a pint jar in which you will put 8 tablespoons of cornmeal (the original recipe measures this in inches high, but it will work out to about 8 tablespoons.) The grist mill ground is best because it is ground much slower and doesn’t “burn” the heart of the corn. Add a pinch each of salt and soda, along with just enough sugar to fill the palm of your hand. This works out to be about 1 teaspoon. Then fill the jar with “scalding” water. Stir well. Cover with a lid and let stand overnight in a warm place (the old recipe says to wrap first in a towel and then place in a paper bag, but the point is to keep it very warm and out of a draft. In later years, the cook would place this concoction near a hot air register to keep it warm.)

    The next morning, take 1 quart of milk (or you can use 1/2 milk and 1/2 water), combine the starter with 1/2 teaspoon salt and add enough “plain” (all-purpose) flour to make a stiff batter. (I found this to be around 4 cups.)

    Stir well. Cover the batter and place the entire bowl in a container of warm water (just warm enough to put your hand in it.) Try to hold the same temperature by setting this in a warm place.  You will likely have to drain some of the water off and replace with warmer water on a continuing basis. Try not to make any drastic change in the temperature as you are adding the warmer water, change only a small amount of water at a time to hold the temperature as constant as possible. It will take 3 to 4 hours to rise. (If it is very slow in rising, you can stir it again, then place the bowl back in the warm water.)

    When the dough rises, combine 1 teaspoon salt, 3 to 4 tablespoons of shortening (butter or lard says the old recipe) and flour enough to make a stiff dough. Then knead for 10 minutes.

    Shape into 3 loaves. Grease the sides of the loaf pans well with butter, then place the loaves in pans and let rise until they are doubled in bulk. This is usually about 45 minutes to 1 hour.

    Bake at 375 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes. When the bread has finished baking, grease the crust heavily with butter as soon as you remove from the oven.

    Note: the instructions were not specific as our recipes are today, and it may take more than one try to get it right, but the results are worth it!

    NOTE: The Country Magazine Test Kitchen has not tested this recipe and therefore cannot attest to the accuracy of the recipe or representation as to the results

    Susie July 1, 2012 at 6:46 pm

    I just printed the reciepe for Pioneer bread, or Salt-rising bread, and it made me remember my mother making a bread from a starter made from potatoes in water which fermented over night. Does anyone remember a bread like this? It had a wonderful taste, yeasty, as I remember. Of course, that was about 65 years ago!! I’d be interested to hear from anyone who remembers such a bread.

    Reply

    Gwen July 4, 2012 at 9:44 pm

    I have never made or tasted the bread, but I have found a recipe for the potato starter, if you would like it.

    Reply

    jerry July 8, 2012 at 8:11 pm

    The potato starter bread sounds familiar to me. I’d appreciate the recipe, too, if you don’t mind. Thank you.

    Reply

    sue maurer February 1, 2013 at 7:36 pm

    I had a receipe like this and we loved the bread but somehow I lost it. Would love to have the receipe if you have time.

    Thank you from Kansas

    Reply

    Louise Stapleton February 24, 2013 at 10:35 pm

    I would love to have the recipe for potato starter for bread. My Mon used to
    make this but I can’t remember her using any yeast beside the potato water. She
    let it set all night in the warmer of the old Home Comfort stove. If you can
    e-mail this I would love it. Thank you.

    adele October 19, 2013 at 9:02 am

    Pls send recipe for potato bread starter

    Reply

    Barbara Pavlock July 10, 2012 at 6:14 pm

    That sounds good can I have the recipe.

    Reply

    Caryl January 10, 2014 at 4:35 pm

    I remember the potato water sitting on the counter. I would love to have the recipe……..thank you

    Reply

    Tk October 29, 2014 at 1:51 pm

    just came across this blog while looking to see if i could make saltrising down south but might be late but this is one from my grams recipes for potato bread/rolls 2 cups water(salt if potatoes aren’t salted),1 cup mashed potatoes,1/4 cup melted shorting, 1/4 cup sugar, 2 eggs, 2 yeast cakes and flour to thicken. sadly that’s all the recipe card said no directions

    Sheila July 11, 2012 at 2:25 am

    I too would like the recipe for the potato starter and I think I’m going to try this
    Pioneer bread recipe.
    Thank you!
    Sheila

    Reply

    Bridget Iovino July 14, 2012 at 3:21 pm

    Was searching recipes and found this website you may be interested in….Hope this helps.

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/home-baked-bread-zmaz73ndzraw.aspx

    Reply

    Elisha July 11, 2012 at 7:02 pm

    I would love to have the starter recipe for potato bread. Have done this in the past and at times would make 10-12 loaves at a time. Wonderful!

    Reply

    Nomi July 12, 2012 at 5:21 pm

    Just wondering if you would send me the potato bread recipe. Thanks

    Reply

    Tempest July 12, 2012 at 10:53 pm

    I would LOVE the patato bread recipe as well!

    Reply

    Stephanie July 13, 2012 at 9:09 pm

    I would love to have the recipe for potato starter. It sounds as good as the salt-rising bread. We love all kinds of homemade bread. Thanks!

    Reply

    Elaine Morgan July 14, 2012 at 4:07 pm

    I would like your potato bread recipe also and thank you very much.

    Reply

    elaine July 19, 2012 at 10:50 pm

    i would also like to have the potato starter recipe

    Reply

    LESLIE HEFLIN July 20, 2012 at 1:43 am

    I would love to receive the recipe for the potato starter!
    leslie

    Reply

    Lois July 29, 2012 at 8:30 pm

    I would also like the recipe for the potato starter. Sounds really good.
    Thanks Loie

    Reply

    lynn smith July 30, 2012 at 5:48 pm

    thanks in advance for the potato bread starter recipe. i made it 25 years ago and lost the starter recipe.

    Reply

    Gwen M Kane December 27, 2012 at 6:00 am

    c\Could it have been sour dough bread? It requires a starter and has a yeasty flavor. We love the bread. You can also purchase at the grocery stores.

    Reply

    Linda January 27, 2013 at 4:44 am

    I would love to have the recipe for potato bread also.

    Thanks
    Linda

    Reply

    bonny zee January 30, 2013 at 6:02 pm

    Receipe for potatoe starter..thanks

    Reply

    Theda February 9, 2013 at 3:45 am

    I would like your potato starter recipe Gwen

    Reply

    catherine maltais February 26, 2013 at 6:29 pm

    would love recipe for potatoe starter thank you.

    Reply

    Liz March 7, 2013 at 3:40 am

    I’d love the potato starter recipe too ;)

    Reply

    Sandy Hoodenpyle April 13, 2013 at 6:12 pm

    I remember my mom making this also. I would love go have the potato bread recipe also.

    Reply

    Brenda September 17, 2013 at 6:18 pm

    Would you share your potato starter with me?
    I have used potato in other recipes and love how smooth and full bodied it tastes.
    Love the idea.
    Thank you.

    Reply

    E Bukks December 8, 2013 at 7:45 pm

    My uncle used to use a starter for which he would gently scrape a “ball” of something” . . . carob? over a fine grater or screen. it seems that whatever that was, it was certainly bound to become round and remain so until it was too small to handle; a few swipes and there was enough to have a fine starter next morning.

    I regret that I have no idea where his recipe is; I’ve lost access to it through a divorce and his passing . . . among the more painful aspects of loss of availability of knowing such a fine person; which also shows up. I guess I’m a slow learner!

    Happy happy risin’s!

    Reply

    Jean January 11, 2014 at 12:42 am

    Gwen , I would love to have that recipe for your potato starter to if you could please send to me . I was given some a long time ago and made it but I didn’t have the starter recipe . My family loved it. God bless you if you could send it to me . Jean

    Reply

    Mell June 17, 2014 at 1:26 pm

    Hi Gwen,

    I just found this site with your info on a recipe for the potato starter for making bread. Do you still have this recipe and if so may I have it. Thank you in advance and it’s wonderful to see that there are still people out there baking.

    Mell

    Reply

    claudia August 29, 2014 at 5:58 pm

    I would like a copy of the potato starter if possible. Have you tried it? If so, how was it? Thank you in advance for sharing.
    Claudia

    Reply

    Linda October 6, 2014 at 6:00 pm

    hello Gwen, if you would not mind I would like the recipe for the potatoes bread.
    thank you for your time in this matter.

    sincerely Yours,
    Linda Bell

    Reply

    Liz July 19, 2012 at 10:27 pm

    I’ve made starter from potato water before. I think it is one way to make a sourdough starter. It’s been a long time since I made it, but I think I may have gotten the recipe online. I love home made bread of any kind!

    Reply

    Robbie Spadafore September 2, 2012 at 12:42 pm

    I grew up eating this bread. My dad loved making Salt Rising Bread. He even made a rising box using a styrofoam cooler and a 15 watt light bulb to keep the bread at the right temperature. I’m 58 years old and when I make this bread, it brings back great memories!

    Reply

    Phyllis in Tx September 6, 2012 at 3:19 pm

    Yes remember, grew up with that homemade “stinky bread” as we called it. Was there any better toast than Salt Rising, Nope!

    Reply

    Nancy February 18, 2013 at 9:53 pm

    Just wanted to tell you that we called it stink bread in Pennsylvania too. Haven’t had any since my grandmother died in 1995. Will definitely try to make this and hope it turns out the way I remember. Thanks for the smile.

    Reply

    John in Maryland November 2, 2013 at 5:47 pm

    Salt rising bread can be purchased in Coudersport, PA at the Giant, (not sure if it is the chain or a local market.) I have family members that go once or twice a year just to pick some up. I think large orders, 20, 30 loaves, etc, can be placed in advance. If you just drive out there for a loaf or two, you may be dissapointed. It sells out fast. My grandmother once told us that when she and her mother would make this bread, her brother would not come home. He couldn’t stand the smell.

    P.S. It doesn’t smell as bad as it did 40 years ago.

    Reply

    Chris in Olean,NY November 7, 2013 at 12:54 am

    Salt Rising Bread is a local favorite in western New York and Northwestern PA. It’s very common here and all the grocery stores have it. Also, it really doesn’t smell bad.

    E Bukks December 8, 2013 at 7:55 pm

    I believe the source of all salt rising bread in Coudersport, Wellsville, Bolivar, and environs, Giant stores is Angelica Bakery . . . jest down the road a piece!

    Pat September 9, 2012 at 7:10 am

    Oh yes, I remember this bread very well. My late mother-in-law used to make it. The potato in water that you speak of, is actually the rising agent. It is a potato yeast plant and you use some of it to make your loaves and save the rest for the next batch. It’s fed with sugar. Unfortunately, I don’t have this recipe so I have no idea how to get the potato yeast plant started. Makes wonderful bread!

    Reply

    Beverly September 16, 2012 at 6:01 am

    I’ve made the bread that you’re talking about. It’s been many years though. And, there’s plenty of starter recipes online. Since I rarely had extra potatoes to do it that way, I’d get out my little starter recipe and put instant mashed potatoes in it for that wonderful taste. I do recall using bread flour, but I’m sure there’s plenty other ways to do it. Come to think of it, I believe I might get back to baking bread as soon as I get moved and I’ll see if I can’t find that starter recipe and friendship bread. I’ll keep you filled in if I find it.

    Reply

    Machelle Loudon October 4, 2012 at 11:11 pm

    Hello Susie! I remember it! I’m 50 years old but we had it every year from a little town in Bedford Indiana. I especially loved it toasted around Thanksgiving with left over turkey. it made the perfect sandwhich and I will never forget the taste. Nothing has even come close to replacing the wonderful flavor. I would love to make it and I hear that a bakery here in Atlanta does but that it isn’t as good as we remember it to be. Good luck with your adventure!

    Reply

    Susan Maxwell-Lewis January 22, 2013 at 8:15 pm

    Pfieffer’s Bakery!!! Loved thier salt rising bread! Can’t wait to try this recipe!!!

    Reply

    Jean Taylor March 5, 2013 at 11:12 pm

    Can I have the recipe? please, please.

    Reply

    Mary Blaylock November 4, 2012 at 5:16 am

    The starter you are talking about is for sourdough bread. Some recipes call for the starter to sit for a couple days and some just overnight. Great bread.

    Reply

    Pat Moeller November 14, 2012 at 2:41 am

    I found a recipe in “The household Searchlight Recipe Book” 1938… that has a recipe using a potato water starter.
    It is called a ‘Yeast Ferment”

    The fermentation period for bread made with dry yeast may be shortened if the following yeast ferment is first prepared.

    1 Medium sized potato
    4 Cups water
    1 Tsp Salt
    1 Cake dry yeast
    1 Tbsp sugar

    Crumble yeast and soften in 1/2 cup water. Wash, pare, and boil potato in 3 1/2 cups water. Drain Potato. Save potato water. Mash potato add sugar and salt. Cool to lukewarm. Add yeast and potato water. If necessary add water to make 1 quart of the mixture. Cover and set in a warm place overnight. Use for making bread and rolls. Any unused portion may be stored in the refrigerator and kept for several days…

    Reply

    Nancy November 19, 2012 at 2:36 pm

    I used to make that bread all the time. we called it Amish Friendship bread.We made it the starter from instant potatoes and sugar. I will look to see if I can find the recipe.

    Reply

    Sonja Kanaar April 22, 2013 at 3:54 am

    I remember the Amish friendship bread. It was delicious and you could do so many different things with it. I tried finding the starter and never could find it. I had the starter for almost 2 years and kept it going. Passed it on to many friends and enjoyed it immensely.

    Reply

    Mary Lou December 9, 2012 at 11:48 pm

    I loved this bread growing up! Occasionally I can find this at the farmer’s market, but it just isn’t as good as what we used to get.

    Reply

    Cheryl December 29, 2012 at 1:49 am

    I make my salt rising bread with sliced potatoes, fresh ground corn meal and farm fresh milk. This is left overnight covered in a warm place, the next day I finish the bread.

    Reply

    Cheryl December 29, 2012 at 1:51 am

    We can buy salt rising bread from our local store/bakery in Wellsville, NY. I also just sent a loaves to friends in Washington and Oregon. Once you have had SRB it is something you always crave toasted :)

    Reply

    Kathy May 3, 2014 at 9:41 pm

    My parents were from Franklinville, NY and moved to Syracuse in the 1950′s. Whenever we went to F-ville, we always went to the Quality Bakery to buy SRB to bring back to Syracuse because you can’t get it here. We called it stinky bread and only ate it toasted. All of the old folks are gone now, but I still have a few cousins in F-ville that I visit and go to the grocery store there and can still get SRB. Brings back many memories for me.

    Reply

    Bernadette February 27, 2013 at 1:08 am

    Sounds delicious. Could you send me recipe.

    Reply

    Carol Durham January 10, 2013 at 1:27 am

    The second recipe listed for salt risen bread is made with fermented potatoes. http://home.comcast.net/~petsonk/

    Reply

    Lavonne Cookman January 25, 2013 at 3:05 am

    I just found this recipe – it includes potatoes. Is this what you wanted?

    Salt-Rising Bread
    1 medium Irish potato, sliced and placed in a jar.
    Add:
    1 T. cornmeal
    1/4 tsp. soda
    1/4 tsp. salt
    2 cups boiling water
    Cover and let rise in warm place until morning. If mixture is foamy and “smellie” the next morning, pour off the liquid and throw away the potatoes.
    Mix 2 cups very warm water with 1/2 cup shortening. Then add 1 teaspoon salt,
    4 teaspoons sugar, and 5 cups of flour. Combine with rising mixture to make a stiff batter. Let rise until double in bulk. Work in 6 cups of flour to make a soft dough. Divide into 3 portions. Let rise
    10 minutes. Knead for 3 minutes. Place in greased pans. Let rise until mixture comes to top of the pan. Bake at
    450 degrees F for 15 minutes, then
    at 400 degrees F for 25 minutes.
    Nutrition Information: Based on standard loaf of 16 slices, one slice has 49 calories, 1.3 grams protein, 9 grams carbohydrates, 0.7 grams fat, and 75 milligrams sodium.

    Reply

    Stephanie January 27, 2013 at 3:35 pm

    Hi, I’m just curious when it calls for soda, what kind of soda this is? #very new to cooking

    Reply

    Susan February 2, 2013 at 3:33 am

    When a recipe calls for “soda”, they are talking about Baking Soda found in the baking isle at the grocery store.

    Reply

    Frances January 25, 2013 at 5:28 pm

    This sounds like Sour Dough Bread. I make it every week, been making for years with a starter from a friend. The recipe makes 3 loaves or about 40 rolls….

    Reply

    Margaret January 28, 2013 at 5:00 pm

    Hi Frances, Would you share your Sour Dough Bread recipe with me. I doesn’t sound like you have to make up a lot of loves. Also can you make it in a bread machine. Thanks mw

    Reply

    Margaret January 28, 2013 at 5:05 pm

    Hi Frances, Would you share your Sour Dough Bread recipe with me. It doesn’t sound like you have to make up a lot of loves at one time. Also can you make it in a bread machine. Thanks mw

    Reply

    Connie February 2, 2013 at 8:12 pm

    The bread you are talking about is Sour Dough. I do make it and my started will be 25 years old in June.

    Reply

    Mike June 11, 2013 at 2:31 am

    You can also make a sour dough starter from natural rye flour that has been ground but minimally processed. I bought Hodgen’s (sp?) Red Mill brand rye, added some water and the next day it was bubbling, then I added a little bit of natural cane sugar and the thing took off! In a week I was handing jars of the stuff out to friends and family. You don’t really need the sugar I just added it because. Starter will last forever if you add a cup of clean water and a cup of unbleached flour to it each time you make bread. I added more rye flour each time but you can work in any unbleached flour. Just be sure you pour off the “beer” that forms on top of the starter before feeding it the new flour and water. Also, don’t drink the “beer” that forms on top.

    Reply

    kristin February 13, 2013 at 4:23 am

    Sourdough Starter

    2 cups lukewarm potato water
    2 cups flour
    1 tablespoon sugar

    First make potato water by cutting up 2 medium-sized potatoes into cubes, and boil in 3 cups of water until tender. Remove the potatoes and measure out two cups of remaining liquid. Mix the potato water, flour and sugar into a smooth paste. Set in a warm place until starter mixture rises to double its original size.

    Sourdough Biscuits

    1 cup sourdough starter
    teaspoon each of salt,
    sugar and soda
    1 tablespoon shortening
    3 to 4 cups sifted flour

    Place flour in a bowl, make a well in the center and add sourdough starter. Stir in salt, soda and sugar, and add shortening. Gradually mix in enough flour to make a stiff dough. Pinch off dough for one biscuit at a time; form a ball and roll it in melted shortening. Crowd the biscuits in a round 8-inch cake pan and allow to nestle in a warm place for 20 to 30 minutes before baking. Bake at 450 until done.

    Reply

    John March 19, 2013 at 2:09 am

    The potato bread starter that everyone keeps describing on this thread seems to be the same stuff as that which is used for old fashioned moonshine mash which ferments in a vat before distillation purifies it into white lightning or hooch. Least ways it is here in the Ozark Mountains of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas. It’s a hillbilly culture thing but I’ve never hands on made it myself.

    Reply

    Leona March 29, 2013 at 12:36 am

    Just wondering, how long does the sourdough starter keep in the refrigierator? I would only use some of this to make a batch of bisquits. Thank you.

    Reply

    Amanda February 23, 2013 at 5:20 pm

    I still make this bread using my grandmothers recipe! It is just like I remember!

    Reply

    Darlene March 8, 2013 at 9:13 pm

    Would love the recipe for potato starter bread if possible.

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    Paul Carroll April 2, 2013 at 8:40 pm

    My mother keep potato started in a maynaise jar. She would start a fresh batch of starter every year and just kept it going, a la Energizer.

    My grandfather would buy wheat in bulk, which we kids were tasked with grinding by hand to his satisfaction. His whole wheat bread was heavy enough to sink a ship, but when it came out of the oven, we would eat a warm loaf with fresh butter standing in the kitchen.

    Reply

    Louise April 9, 2013 at 8:02 pm

    I remember the Salt-Rising bread from a potaote starter. I baked that bread every week for years. It does have the best taste.

    Reply

    Sasha Mayer April 12, 2013 at 5:28 pm

    Susie, the potato starter bread is alive in our area:) My starter is at least 70 years old per lady that shared it, however nobody seems to recall how to make the starter from scratch. If you are ever in North Dakota I will be glad to share it with you:)

    Reply

    Maggie May 30, 2013 at 8:22 am

    I remember my grandmother making this bread. Over time, I lost the instructions for making it and was telling my class about it when we were making butter. The next day, one of my students brought me a jar of starter for this potato based bread that had come from her great-grandmother’s original starter.This is the only bread her family ever eats.
    I feed my starter religiously and it is now a requested Christmas gift for one of my brothers…and he doesn’t share!

    Reply

    Mike June 11, 2013 at 2:15 am

    I’ve done this! When I was learning to bake as a kid I found this recipe in my grandfather’s book on cowboys from the TimeLife series on the Wild West. There were several recipes in the chapter about the chuck wagon.

    Reply

    Megan August 1, 2013 at 12:15 am

    My mom makes her coffee cake this way

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    Judy August 19, 2013 at 11:03 pm

    This is a the potato starter that I know. I would use two cups of the potato water and 2 cups flour and take one cup out to make your bread. This is a wild yeast and it takes longer to rise a loaf of bread than conventional yeast.

    Potato starter–
    Scrub a potato well. Boil it in a pot until it falls apart. Pour off the water into a container.
    Take 1 cup of this water. I like little chunks of potato in mine but no potato skin.
    Put in a crock with 1 cup of flour. I use unbleached white bread flour.
    Cover with a clean dish towel let set out on a counter until it gets bubbly. It depends on how warm the area you put it is on how long this will take. You can make more by adding equal amounts of water and flour. Plain water or more potato water.
    I have had one of these in a crock bubbling in my fridge for 6 years now. Lost my last one when my house burned.
    I make all kinds of bread, sweet rolls, pancakes etc with this.

    Reply

    Cindy February 27, 2014 at 1:47 pm

    You are thinking of sour dough bread. The starter has sugar, yeast, water and potato flakes. It is an excellent bread great for toast and sandwiches or just eating with butter. Look for Nadine’s Sour Dough Bread recipe online. I find it to be the best because you don’t have to keep and feed starter, you make fresh each time you bake.

    Reply

    jennifer sanders April 10, 2014 at 5:09 pm

    the salt rising bread made with potatoes is in the Joy of Cooking cookbook p.607

    Reply

    Pat July 29, 2014 at 11:52 am

    My husbands family in Western MIchigan always had salt rising bread. I live in the south now and no one here knows what is is. I’m glad to see this recipe. It seems much easier than others I’ve read. Salt Rising bread has a smell so different from other breads. Once you smell it, you don’t forget it. Thankfully the taste makes up for it all.

    Reply

    aptwalker July 29, 2014 at 5:04 pm

    I do. My grandmother turned 70 y/o the year I was born. She was born in 1884 and died in 1986 just shy of her 98th birthday. Can you imagine the changes in our world that she experienced in her lifetime? I used to love to make homemade bread with her when I was a child. She lived with us from somewhere around the year I turned 8. She and my mother used to make a bread using potato mash. I don’t know if it always replaced yeast or not though. I sure wish I had my mother’s old recipe box.

    Reply

    Georgie Gardiner August 3, 2014 at 7:09 pm

    My mother always used a potato starter. I remember it well. I think I have the recipe for the potato starter. I will look for it.

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    Jerry Woodard October 7, 2014 at 7:26 pm

    Remember it well as my mom baked in the winter. Here is her recipe.
    Ingredients
    3 Med Potatoes
    1 tsp sugar
    4 cups of boiling water
    3 TBS Corn Meal
    1 tsp Salt

    Dough Ingredients
    2 cups of lukewarm Milk
    1/8 tsp Baking Soda
    1 cup Water
    2 TBS melted Shortening
    1/8 tsp Salt
    Flour

    Pare and slice the potatoes. Add the Cornmeal, sugar, 1 tsp salt & 4 cups of boiling water.
    Wrap the bowl in heavy cloth. Cover let stand in a warm place over night. In the morning remove the potatoes. To the cornmeal mixture add milk, baking soda, water, salt and shortening. Add enough flour to make dough stiff enough to knead. Knead until smooth and elastic. Form into 3 loaves. Place in well greased pans. Cover and let rise until double in bulk. Bake at 400deg about 45 minutes.

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    Peggy Groseclose October 15, 2014 at 6:20 pm

    My mother-in-law very carefully taught me to make salt-rising bread. It did take several small red potatoes, which we sliced with a potato peeler (skins and all), added 3 Tbsp white cornmeal (preferably stone ground), 1/4 tsp baking soda and 1 1/2 Tablespoons of sugar. Place in warm place (bout 110 degrees) overnight or until batter begins to bubble. Keep checking the temp. during the night.
    The next morning strain out the potatoes and pour the liquid from the starter into a bowl. Add 2 c. warm water, 2 T. sugar a pinch of soda and enough flour to make a batter. Set aside in a warm place until light and bubbly and doubled in bulk.
    Add 1/4 cup liquid shortening (cooled) and 2 tsp. salt. Add flour a little at a time to make a fairly stiff dough. Knead until similar to other light breads. Place in greased bread pans, filling about 1/2 full. Let rise to top. Bake at 375 degrees for 40-45 minutes.

    This bread tastes best when sliced thin and toasted. All the family loves it. Peggy

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    JoLynn July 11, 2012 at 4:26 pm

    The potato bread sounds wonderful! Would you please be so kind as to send the recipe to me as well? Thanks so much!!

    Reply

    Dolores July 11, 2012 at 6:40 pm

    This sounds so good nothing like good homemade breab.

    would you please send me this also. thankyou . Dolores

    Reply

    Kathy July 12, 2012 at 1:53 am

    I have to try this bread recipe. It sounds like something my grandmother used to make. I,too, would like the potato starter recipe if you don’t mind. Thanks!!

    Reply

    Jan July 12, 2012 at 6:15 am

    The potato breads is interesting could I too get the recipe??? Thanks

    Reply

    Deborah July 12, 2012 at 10:54 am

    I would also like the potato bread recipe too.

    Reply

    Debbie July 12, 2012 at 5:29 pm

    Potato recipe please

    Reply

    Gwen July 12, 2012 at 6:45 pm

    Goodness, I never expected so much interest! I will be glad to provide it to you all. I kind of doubt this venue will allow me enough room to post it here, so give me a couple of days to make up a document with the information, then I’ll get back on here and we’ll see if I can do it here, or if I’ll need to give an email address for those interested.

    Reply

    Lorie West July 12, 2012 at 6:55 pm

    Hi Gwen! We warned you–our pioneer bread is super-popular, and it looks like potato starter bread is going to be just as sought-after! If you send us the recipe, we’ll be happy to post it here for you. And remember to tell us your full name, city and state so we can give you credit for sharing! email us at editors@country-magazine.com or use the Submit Your Story form on this website.

    Reply

    John March 19, 2013 at 2:11 am

    I’d also like the potato bread recipe please.

    Reply

    celia horton July 12, 2012 at 6:57 pm

    I have the potato bread recipe, i will try to find it tonight and post it tomorrow, if no one else has posted it. :) LOVE< LOVE LOVE homemade bread!!!!!!

    Reply

    Sarah Kennedy July 13, 2012 at 7:16 pm

    Salt Rising is one of my favorite kinds of bread. You can buy it in the grocery store in the grocery stores in Allegheny County in the southern tier of NY. I believe its Pennsylvania Dutch heritage. It makes the best grilled cheese with sharp NY cheddar or toast! Can’t wait to try making it myself.

    Reply

    Pamela July 23, 2012 at 4:56 am

    The Angelica Bakery in Angelica, NY makes the best Salt-rising bread in Allegany County. When Alfred State’s Culinary program is running a person can call up the bakery and order a few loaves from there as well. Otherwise you can find it in most of the local grocery stores. We are crazy about our Salt-rising bread here in Allegany County! It’s used for many types of sandwiches and some have used it for bread pudding. Unfortunately, the shelf life is short, so eat it up quick. Of course it’s so good it never sits around long enough to go bad. :)

    Reply

    Amanda Graves September 4, 2012 at 4:00 am

    I grew up in Allegheny County (Wellsville) but now live in Austin, TX. Salt rising bread is one of the things I miss the most about the food in western NY. It’s impossible to find down here. So glad to find this recipe!

    Reply

    Angie July 13, 2012 at 8:28 pm

    I’m excited to try this recipe. Thanks so much for posting!!

    Reply

    Gwen July 13, 2012 at 10:14 pm

    For those of you who have requested the recipe for the bread using a potato starter, I have sent the recipe to Lorie West at Country Magazine, and she’s going to set it up so everyone can get it.

    Celia, it would be fun to see your recipe and to see how closely it resembles mine. Sometimes you can’t get too much of a good thing, and in my mind recipes fit nicely into that category!

    Reply

    Gwen July 14, 2012 at 4:09 am

    To all of you who have requested the recipe for potato starter bread, Lorie has posted it under the “Good Neighbors Blog” page, so back up to that page to get it. Happy Baking!

    Reply

    heidi July 14, 2012 at 6:32 am

    Oooh, this will be fun to try! Can’t wait to try the potato one too, and see how they compare. We love fresh, homemade bread!

    Reply

    Carolyn July 14, 2012 at 11:48 am

    This brings back memories of my childhood! I would walk home from our one-room country school half frozen. The house would be full of that wonderful aroma of Mom’s bread. Yes, as soon as it was ready. we cut a thick slice and buttered it with churned butter. Yum! Have you noticed no candle company has been able to duplicate that aroma! I will print this recipe, and I would love to have the potato bread recipe, too! Thanks for all the wonderful memories!

    Reply

    Linda July 14, 2012 at 8:17 pm

    I have a problem with digesting yeast so I can’t wait to try this bread recipe. Thanks!

    Reply

    Karen July 16, 2012 at 4:14 am

    I would love the potato starter as well, thank you so much!

    Reply

    IlaRae July 17, 2012 at 12:57 pm

    I would also like the recipe for the potato starter bread. I’d love to try it. I have increased the recipe I use for bread and it makes 22-25 loaves. Love to make bread!

    Reply

    Jemiro November 1, 2012 at 8:45 am

    Goody! What do you do with 22 loaves of bread?! Do you freeze them for later, or give them away…? How is it possible to knead all that dough at once! I find it hard for my arm muscles to knead for 2 loaves at a time. Or, it could be that our sizes differ. Here in Europe, a large loaf is about 750-1000gr . A small loaf would be 350-550gr approx. And come to think of it: electrical mixers like Kenwood or KitchenAid maybe aren’t as common as far as I know: in other words, I knead by hand, and that isn’t so handy with a batch too large. :) I wonder how you manage :) Kind regards from Germany

    Reply

    Cheryl December 29, 2012 at 1:57 am

    We loved Germany! The brochen rolls were the best !!

    Reply

    sue October 8, 2014 at 3:14 am

    Yeah! How about sharing a good brochen recipe! Son in law would love as much as me..the only bread maker in the family…

    Reply

    Lorraine July 18, 2012 at 2:37 am

    Thank you all for sharing…Please include me in with the recipes if you will…l cannot wait to try them..Again “Thank You”.

    Reply

    Kate Morgan July 18, 2012 at 5:39 pm

    I’d also love to have the potato bread recipe!
    IlaRae how on earth do you manage 22 – 25 loave recipe? Do you have professional kitchen/utensils, etc?

    Reply

    Joyce Bradshaw July 18, 2012 at 5:49 pm

    Please, please send me the potato bread starter bread recipe. Thank you.

    Reply

    Georgine G July 18, 2012 at 11:28 pm

    This sounds yummy! I haven’t heard of it but sure am interested in trying both. Please send me the recipe too please!

    Reply

    Jenn Curtis July 19, 2012 at 11:49 am

    I too would love to receive the potato bread recipe.
    Thank you,
    Jenn

    Reply

    Lynn Arthur July 19, 2012 at 3:24 pm

    I would love the potato starter bread recipe as well. Cant wait to try the pioneer bread. Feeling inspired!!

    Reply

    Linda July 19, 2012 at 6:29 pm

    Please count me in also–I would love to receive the potato bread recipe.

    Reply

    Charity Lyon July 19, 2012 at 6:51 pm

    I will take the potato bread recipe along with everyone else!!! Thanks!!!!

    Reply

    Bonnie July 19, 2012 at 10:31 pm

    me too me too for the potato bread recipe.

    Reply

    Liz July 19, 2012 at 10:55 pm

    I am attempting this today! :) My only fear- since I couldn’t locate fresh ground corn meal- is that the polenta I did find will not ferment the right way. Wish me luck!

    Reply

    Cheryl December 29, 2012 at 1:58 am

    you must use fresh ground corn meal, the course. Natural food stores carry it.

    Reply

    Rebecca Mick July 20, 2012 at 5:21 pm

    I would also like the potato bread recipe! Thank you!

    Reply

    Angie July 20, 2012 at 6:39 pm

    I would love the potato bread recipe too please! Thanks!!

    Reply

    Theresa July 22, 2012 at 6:15 pm

    Has anyone adapted this recipe to use with a Bosch mixer? Can I use it in place of the hand kneading?

    Reply

    Lorie West July 23, 2012 at 2:09 am

    Just a reminder, there’s no need to wait for anyone to send you the potato starter bread recipe, it’s posted in full on our blog here: http://www.country-magazine.com/good-neighbors-blog/potato-starter-bread-by-popular-demand/

    Reply

    Martha McNeely July 23, 2012 at 5:14 pm

    OH I can’t wait to try the potato bread AND the Pioneer Bread! I’m going to do the Pioneer Bread first because that’s why I came here!! But I will do both…Thanks so much!

    Reply

    Yvonne July 28, 2012 at 3:45 am

    How do I go about getting the recipe for the pioneer Bread ? Thanks and God Bless

    Reply

    Yvonne July 28, 2012 at 3:50 am

    I didn’t read enough above and found the recipe.. Sorry to have bothered anyone.

    Reply

    John Porter Sr July 28, 2012 at 10:14 pm

    I would also like to try both the potato bread & pioneer bread. Would like the recepies.

    Reply

    Julie Henry August 4, 2012 at 10:54 pm

    As an urban homesteader, I am continually researching ways to make modern conveniences by hand. We will be moving to the country soon with limited resources and although we are prepared in many ways, I was concerned regarding my bread making if no yeast was readily available. Thanks for sharing this recipe, It was just what I was looking for. On a side note, I have also found many pioneer recipes where they used the whey water from cheesemaking in the bread as well as in soup stock.

    Reply

    Margo August 8, 2012 at 6:23 pm

    I remember my father loving salt rising bread and my mother searching everywhere for it! Thanks for this recipe…I am going to attempt to make it!

    Reply

    karen August 26, 2012 at 2:50 pm

    Just wondering . . .does this recipe for salt rising bread have a VERY strong odor when rising and baking?
    The reason I ask, is because my mom used to keep a “starter” for salt rising bread in the refrigerator, and every now and then she would make this bread.
    But, I will say very diplomatically, that the odor was very “Pungent” and not at all pleasant, BUT the flavor of the bread was good, but different.
    She had gotten the starter from a friend of my father, so have no idea how it was originally started.
    (AND, I will add a caveat, that my mom was an expert bread maker–she made ALL our loaf bread by hand from as long as I can remember. I did not know what store-bought loaf bread was until I started public school in the first grade. And that was in 1963.)
    Any comments will be appreciated.

    Reply

    Phillis August 27, 2012 at 12:54 am

    I have made Sour Dough Bread for years. My family loves it and I love to give it away as a “happy” or “just because” college Kids and it really goes over well at Church dinners. I wrap the bread that I am not going to use for family in heavy duty foil, then in a plastic store bought bread bag and tie it up. Good to have when the unexpected happens, good, or sad.

    Reply

    Jill September 8, 2012 at 8:45 pm

    I just tried to make this recipe as written… with terrible success!! 1 quart of milk to 4 cups of flour does NOT make a stiff dough. Not even 8 cups of flour to that much liquid makes a stiff dough. My dough is sticky, tasteless, and does not have any “rising” ability. Where did I go wrong?? Or are there errors in the recipe?

    Anyone actually MADE this recipe as written? HELP!

    Reply

    Alli November 6, 2012 at 3:38 pm

    Jill – read again. ;) 1 quart of milk and the four cup of flour makes a stiff BATTER, that you put in the bowl of warm water. NOT dough. After that all sits to rise for like 4 hours, you add MORE flour. Check your directions (which I admit are somewhat confusing) again for that part. :)

    Reply

    martha November 16, 2012 at 3:08 am

    i als0 had a bread failure with this : made it for 1st time last week, if it was gold it would save the world economy!!!!!!!! the initial starter etc was good but after that it was down hill _____ ____really down. my other usual bread recipe cosists of some whole wheat flour so even after adding just a little w,w, extra beating and kneading // isuppose the error was mine , so i probably wont make it again. however the chickens had a real fight trying who could get the most. maybe icould patent it for chicken feed?????

    Reply

    Tiffany October 5, 2012 at 7:31 pm

    Possible to alter this recipe for no milk ?

    Reply

    DJ November 5, 2012 at 12:29 am

    Maybe you could try Almond Milk.

    Reply

    Anonymous October 20, 2012 at 1:05 pm

    Jill, the recipe said the quart of milk & the 4 cups flour would make a stiff batter-not a stiff dough. May have went wrong when adding more than the 4 cups flour. That would cause the tasteless dough you describe. Better luck next time! :)

    Reply

    val October 24, 2012 at 1:01 am

    I just tried the recipe for salt-rising bread, and just as Jill stated in her comment, I too read the recipe wrong. the milk and starter makes a stiff BATTER not DOUGH! instead of throwing the whole thing out, completed the recipe as directed but only used enough flour to work with the dough—- it rose beautifully and i had no more difficulty with the recipe however i expect the bread to be very heavy. I also placed my dough in the bowl of very warm water and then placed the bowl on a heating pad to keep it at a constant temp. I already have my starter going for a new batch the correct way and I am looking forward to comparing the two .

    Reply

    kathy November 2, 2012 at 1:21 pm

    I am allergic to yeast and this looks like a great recipe to try. The bread I buy commercially is very expensive and can be dry. Can’t wait to try this.

    Reply

    BonnieLass December 28, 2012 at 5:46 pm

    Just to clarify… there IS yeast in this bread. Instead of adding a packet of commercial yeast, wild yeast is captured naturally from the environment using the starter mixture. Not sure if there is a difference (wild yeast vs commercial yeast) to the people who posted about yeast allergies, but thought it worth mentioning.

    Reply

    Elizabeth November 6, 2012 at 2:20 am

    Put apple cores and peelings into a jar fill with warm water and add a tablespoon of sugar. shake it everyday for 3 or 4 days until you see bubbles forming at the top. Use the water in replace of regular water in your bread recipe, and forget the yeast. Follow bread recipe as you normally would. Works wonders! :D

    Reply

    Maureen Reid January 4, 2013 at 5:33 pm

    Thanks for your idea will try

    Reply

    Donna Cranmore January 28, 2013 at 4:29 pm

    Could you please tell me how many cores and peels to use ?

    Reply

    Joan Chamlee December 3, 2012 at 7:17 am

    As a child my mom would buy salt rising bread from Von’s Market in Southern California. We loved it. They stopped making it at least 40yrs. ago. I hope this test like it. Excited to give it a try.

    Reply

    Debbi December 5, 2012 at 3:55 am

    Thank you for this recipe. Every time we made a trip to Bowling Green, KY we would stop at the bakery and get a few loaves of Salt Rising Bread. It makes the best breakfast toasted with butter. Heading there after Christmas , so I will up some and make some to compare.

    Reply

    Vanessa Logan December 7, 2012 at 4:50 am

    Hello,

    My husband is trying to make the salt risen bread and is having problems with the sponge.
    He has the starter down pack but the sponge part is giving him problems, any suggestions will help. Once he places back into water, it seperates. How can he prevents the seperation

    Reply

    Ashley January 21, 2013 at 5:04 pm

    Probably not keeping the temp as close to same as possible. Says not to change water temp quickly- probably affects it quite a bit.

    Reply

    karen mitchell-day January 11, 2013 at 3:00 pm

    The pic of Doris looks so sweet, I just want to adopt her as my Gramma!
    I love recipes from the past, thanks for posting!

    Reply

    Sara Robiosn January 13, 2013 at 11:47 pm

    The Manor Bread Company went door to door with baking goods and
    Salt Rising Bread was a staple. I remember toasting this as a child and there was nothing like it on a cold winter day. Can’t wait to try this.

    Reply

    Hilda Hardcastle February 12, 2014 at 6:05 am

    Sara, The Manor Man brought our salt rising bread when I was a child in Dallas! I grieve for it to this day. Manor also made the BEST soft chewy date nut bars rolled in conf. sugar, and the best bear claws I’ve ever tasted. Where did you grow up?

    Reply

    Kathy Grinam January 31, 2013 at 12:44 am

    I have a horrible time with yeast as well. May I please have the potato recipe?
    Thanks in advance.

    Reply

    Debbe February 6, 2013 at 2:20 am

    “When the dough rises, combine 1 teaspoon salt, 3 to 4 tablespoons of shortening (butter or lard says the old recipe) and flour enough to make a stiff dough. Then knead for 10 minutes.”

    First off how much does the batter rise and second, does the above just get mixed into the batter and then kneaded?

    Thanks!

    Reply

    Nana February 20, 2013 at 11:22 pm

    Just curious, could this be put into bowl and set inside a crockpot set on low? I would love to try it, but wouldn’t be able to devote the time to keeping water a constant temp.

    Reply

    Susan February 27, 2013 at 2:46 pm

    Thank you for this recipe. I was sad to see that it started with cornmeal though, as I am allergic to cornmeal. Not sure what is in it that triggers migraines, but it is only when it is in it’s soft form. Like in bread. If it is crispy, like in corn chips, it doesn’t bother me. Weird, I know, but believe me, I have fully tested the theory as I have had these migraines since I was 10 years old. I am now 47. I love Cornbread, but can’t eat it; and love homemade bread, but the yeast in fresh bread also causes problems for me, so this really got me excited! I really appreciate all the other posts about the potato starter as this will be what I will be able to use! Woo Hoo! thank you all for the posts and thank you Doris for a great recipe! Even though I won’t be able to use the cornmeal, I know that it will help someone else. It is obviously the starch that is what is needed. Corn & Potato both have starch. Again, I thank you all! I am so excited to give this a try!

    Reply

    Kelley P March 4, 2013 at 8:46 pm

    Breads like this are using the natural occurring yeast in the air. That is why sour dough bread made in one area will taste different than the same recipe made elsewhere. I’m not particularly fond of sour dough bread except in San Francisco.

    Reply

    Kelly March 26, 2013 at 6:01 pm

    I have the same question as Debbie – do you add the butter cold, softened, or melted?? My son and I are making this as part of a study on pioneers.

    Thanks!

    Reply

    Trina H. April 9, 2013 at 10:57 am

    I am new to baking bread and was just wondering if you can set the bowl in an oven on a very low temperature to help it stay warm as it rises and maybe even leave the oven door open a little bit so it doesn’t overhear? Any thoughts would be appreciated.

    Reply

    Leanne April 15, 2013 at 5:23 am

    Trina – I have used the oven before. I turn it onto the lowest (225 to 250), let it preheat. Then turn it OFF. Place the dough in and close the door. Watch it though as the rising time may be much less and the bread does not seem to have the same consistency as a slower rise. That being said, it is better than turning up the heat in the entire house just for bread.

    Reply

    Leanne April 15, 2013 at 5:19 am
    Leanne April 15, 2013 at 5:21 am
    Rebecca April 27, 2013 at 5:47 pm

    Can someone help me with this recipe? At what point am I to combine the jarred ingredients with the milk and flour batter? This is confusing and I cannot afford to mess it up! (newbie)
    ——–
    Directions state:
    The next morning, take 1 quart of milk (or you can use 1/2 milk and 1/2 water), combine the starter with 1/2 teaspoon salt and add enough “plain” (all-purpose) flour to make a stiff batter. (I found this to be around 4 cups.)
    Stir well. Cover the batter and place the entire bowl in a container of warm water (just warm enough to put your hand in it.) Try to hold the same temperature by setting this in a warm place. … It will take 3 to 4 hours to rise. (If it is very slow in rising, you can stir it again, then place the bowl back in the warm water.)
    When the dough rises, combine 1 teaspoon salt, 3 to 4 tablespoons of shortening (butter or lard says the old recipe) and flour enough to make a stiff dough. Then knead for 10 minutes.
    ————
    WHAT AM I DOING WITH THE MILK? AND AT WHAT POINT? MIXED WITH WHAT? It says “batter” but then says “dough” (????) The following is my current understanding and I need to be corrected or confirmed PLEASE and THANK YOU!!!!
    MY UNDERSTANDING:
    COMBINE 1 quart of Milk AND 4 cups of Flour into a BATTER and THEN MIX with the starter jar that was prepped earlier…. let rise, covered, in warm water, consistent temp, for about 3-4 hours, add salt, shortening, and enough flour to make a stiff DOUGH, knead ten min.

    Am I correct????

    Reply

    Nancy August 25, 2013 at 1:22 am

    I too find this part very unclear, the whole paragraph starting with “When the dough rises”. Can someone clarify??

    Reply

    bonnie June 13, 2013 at 1:17 pm

    I’m in the process of making this now. I can see why some call it stinky bread!
    Took a bit of work to get the batter to rise, but 3rd time is the charm and I was able to get it going without any waist.
    I would like to keep some starter…do I keep some of the batter part or the dough?

    Reply

    Katie June 13, 2013 at 6:11 pm

    OMG!!! I first had salt rising bread when I was a little girl visiting my family in Indiana. The recipe has been in my family since my great great aunt over a hundred years ago! This is the first I’ve EVER found anyone outside my family that knows what salt rising bread is. That’s awesome!

    Reply

    david June 26, 2013 at 2:25 pm

    Salt rising bread can be ordered from the cuba cheese shoppe (585) 968-3949 or from their website. They ship the Angelica Bakerys Salt rising bread all over the country and i work there and still eat this bread every morning with my coffee. I also like to slice the bread myself for french toast and grilled cheese sandwiches…My boss, Dorothy Graham, has been in business since 1969 making this bread and its a staple in the Southern Tier of New York State and has been for many years. I hope this helps make things easier for novice bakers that would rather order the bread then try to make this themselves as it is a lengthy and tricky process. Have a great day everyone and enjoy.

    Reply

    maurainelle August 9, 2013 at 6:50 pm

    David, thanks for the info! Glad to see Angelica and the Southern Tier rightly mentioned here. Do you know if the bakery is still open?

    Reply

    PaulM. June 21, 2014 at 5:58 pm

    There is NOTHING ! that compares to the memory inducing properties of fresh cooked/cooking bread…. To this day I can still remember my Grandmother baking bread and biscuits on Saturday morning…. as kids we would go next door to her house and go into the kitchen to watch television …it was a black and white set with a screen slightly larger than a 2lb. coffee can…. and she would give us a warm roll with margarine on it…. Heaven was never so close as then…. every flat surfaced was covered in bread and rolls cooling. Thanks “MA”

    Reply

    Amy July 16, 2014 at 7:36 pm

    I enjoyed seeing the article about this pioneer bread in country magazine. My sister and I just started a blog (ourgrandmothersrecipebox.wordpress.com) where we are trying to make as many of our grandmother’s recipes as we can. They’re not as old as the pioneer bread by any means, but there is definitely a unique and delicious flavor in “old fashioned country foods.”

    Reply

    Rhonda July 29, 2014 at 1:55 pm
    Julie August 3, 2014 at 10:03 pm

    Thank you for posting this ( and the link from Homestead Survival). We were talking the other day about making certain foods in an emergency situation, and if you could store yeast long-term. If you can’t get to the store to get bread or yeast, what are you to do? Voila! You just answered my question :-) I can’t wait to try this!

    Reply

    Helen September 22, 2014 at 5:07 am

    Thank you for this post and the link to potato starter – I just found it on Pinterest and found it fascinating reading. I am going to try making it next weekend, also the potato starter version later.
    I remember reading somewhere that Pioneers often used to carry their sourdough starter in a jar next to their skin in winter, to keep it going – it was so precious to them.

    Reply

    martha ensminger October 7, 2014 at 2:00 am

    Informative article. I like to try new things and hope to make this one day. I like old recipes. My grandmother was raised on a farm. She was a very good cook. However, most of her recipes died with her. I was able to get just a few of her baking recipes, which I greatly treasure.

    Reply

    Richard C. French October 16, 2014 at 2:58 pm

    How do I get a copy of Doris Musick’s Salt Rising Bread recipe?? Please advise. Thank you..

    Reply

    Romana November 17, 2014 at 1:40 am

    I just finished reading about a Family of pioneers in North Dakota that made this bread. I was so excited to find the actual recipe! Did anyone ever try to make a gluten- free version? My daughter has celiac’s disease and I have to switch all of my baking to gluten- free. Any advice was be appriciated!

    Reply

    Cristy Davis November 19, 2014 at 4:21 pm

    I love this story…I am going to try this bread. I already use a recipe that is pretty old, but this is wonderful…I would like to know if this precious woman would consider sharing more of that wonderful book full of recipes! Thanks so much and God bless…

    Reply

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